South Sudan
Emergency response to South Sudan conflict
June 2016~

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The Republic of South Sudan gained its independence on July 9, 2011, and two years later in December 2013, armed conflict broke out and spread throughout the country in this new nation. In the end of April 2016, the transitional government of national unity (TGoNU) was finally formed, however, due to severe critical factors including the ravaged economy and the government's financial crisis, violence flared in Juba around Independence Day in July. As a result, millions of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) have no prospects for returning home.

At JPF, we have been assisting repatriation and implementing capacity building projects for government and communities to promote Consolidation of Peace since 2006. Starting in 2014, JPF has been offering emergency response for those who have become refugees and IDPs due to the newly erupted civil war. We conducted a field assessment in 2016 to ascertain the validity of extending assistance for this protracted humanitarian crisis and to determine the program policy based on this assessment. Consequently, we are currently implementing shelter, water and sanitation, protection, and educational projects as well. While showing JPF commitment to the field, JPF member NGOs implement projects in high-risk and rural areas, too. Currently, we are active in South Sudan, Ethiopia, and Uganda. We will respond flexibly should anything unexpected arise in the future.

Due to the prolonged conflict, numbers of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and refugees have increased.
We are committed to preventing the spread of cholera through improving hygienic environments, and to delivering education to the children.

The humanitarian crisis in South Sudan originated from an armed conflict in December 15, 2013, and have since turned into a civil war. At Japan Platform (JPF), in order to respond to this ongoing crisis, we have continued providing aid to Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and refugees who have fled to neighboring countries.

Initially, the conflict saw some movement toward political resolution with mediation by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), but the ceasefire agreement was not honored. Fighting persisted in rural areas, and the national economy continued to worsen. As of August 2015, there are over 1.6 million IDPs, and more than 620,000 refugees are said to have fled to neighboring countries (*1). At JPF, in order to respond to this complex humanitarian crisis (CHE), 7 Member NGOs have carried out 9 projects in South Sudan and Kenya, and expanding to Ethiopia and Uganda as well.

Within South Sudan, JPF Member NGOs have implemented hygiene aid projects through building emergency latrines and bathing facilities, collecting trash, and raising awareness of hygiene issues at United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS) Protection of Civilians (PoC) Sites in Central Equatoria and Jonglei States. These efforts contribute to maintaining the minimal hygienic environments even under harsh conditions, and to preventing cholera and other infectious diseases. In Jonglei State's Bor County, Member NGOs distributed emergency goods to those who fled the fighting, and in Juba, new initiatives have been undertaken to support victims of violence and to prevent conflict. And to help cope with the sudden influx of South Sudanese refugees in neighboring countries of Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda, Member NGOs worked on setting up new refugee camps through water provision, improvement of hygiene environments, emergency education, and establishment of pediatric wards.

It is very difficult to implement aid activities within South Sudan, as Member NGOs must remotely operate their activities while based in neighboring countries, and there have been projects that could not be completed. Despite these difficulties, at the JPF Standing Committee Meeting in January 2015, the Committee decided on the extension of this South Sudan Emergency Aid Program to the end of May 2016, citing how JPF can make unique contributions based on what we have learned from our experiences so far.

NGO's Project : Peace Winds Japan (PWJ)

We improved sanitation and hygiene in the IDP camp and surrounding areas in the capital city of Juba.

NGO's ProjectSince the end of 2013, in Juba, Republic of South Sudan, we have been providing sanitation and hygiene improvement assistance for internally displaced persons (IDPs) who have fled to Juba and for their host communities. As population density is high in the IDP camp, it can easily become unsanitary and unhygienic with trash and sewage, and many lives are lost each summer as a result of the cholera outbreak. PWJ has contributed to the improvement of sanitation and hygiene for about 58,000 people, through assisting in the construction and repairs of toilets and bathing facilities, and training sanitation and hygiene promoters within the camp and in surrounding communities.

Voice from the Field

I want to save my little siblings' lives with the knowledge I gained from the sanitation and hygiene club.

Voice from the FieldMy little sister died because of cholera. I signed up to be in the sanitation and hygiene club because I didn't want to lose any more of my little siblings. I want to remember everything I learned in the sanitation and hygiene workshops - such as handwashing, proper use of toilets, and the importance of keeping our bodies clean - and tell my classmates about them, too. I'm already passing on this knowledge to my family and neighbors. Through our activities, I hope we can get rid of cholera in our area. - Beneficiary of a PWJ project