Afghanistan
Emergency Assistance for Afghan Repatriated Refugees
Japanese

  • ©AAR Japan ©AAR Japan
  • ©AAR Japan ©AAR Japan
  • ©SVA ©SVA
  • ©SVA ©SVA
  • ©SVA ©SVA
  • ©SVA ©SVA

SVA’s Program in Afghanistan

28th May 2020 4:00

  • Beneficiary school’s condition before project implementation (*Photo taken before the spread of COVID-19) ©SVABeneficiary school’s condition before project implementation (*Photo taken before the spread of COVID-19) ©SVA
  • Beneficiary school’s condition before project implementation (*Photo taken before the spread of COVID-19) ©SVABeneficiary school’s condition before project implementation (*Photo taken before the spread of COVID-19) ©SVA

As a JPF grant project, JPF member NGO Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA) has been implementing education and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) programs to support internally displaced persons (IDPs) and repatriated refugees in Kunar Province in Afghanistan. Due to conflict and natural disasters, many Afghans have become refugees and IDPs, and it has been difficult for the children among them to receive education regularly.

SVA’s project secures access to educational opportunities and WASH services for these children through distributing educational materials as well as setting up temporary learning spaces and WASH facilities. The objective is to have children attend safe schools so that the risks of child abuse, child labor, and child recruitment into becoming soldiers can be diminished. The project will allow for around 1,300 children to learn in safe schools.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, project implementation must be accompanied by careful considerations for the prevention of infections. The local staff at the SVA office in Afghanistan attended the infection prevention workshop by World Health Organization (WHO), and learned about the types of knowledge and information about infection prevention that they need to impart to their beneficiaries and to others involved in the implementation of their projects.

Please see here for more details: https://bit.ly/3c4nXPI

CWS’s Reservoir Now Collecting Water

30th April 2020 10:41

  • ©CWS©CWS

As a JPF grant project, JPF member NGO CWS Japan (CWS) has been providing agricultural assistance in Bamiyan, Afghanistan, to help alleviate the loss brought on by the drought. Due to a decrease in the amount of rain in the winter of 2017 and 2018, a large-scale drought occurred in the country and the irrigation channels were dried up. CWS had been working to assist farmers who were affected by the drought, lost their farmland, and were struggling to make ends meet by fixing irrigation facilities. In this picture, you can see how water has returned to the reservoir. Use of this water can not only secure food safety but also lead to revitalization of livelihood as people’s incomes increase.

CWS’s posts can be found here:
https://twitter.com/Japan_CWS/status/1254539297744539648
https://www.instagram.com/p/B_dfKIylez0/

Poultry Farming Program for Women

23rd March 2020 15:00

  • ©CWS Japan©CWS Japan

JPF member NGO CWS Japan (CWS) is providing agricultural assistance in Afghanistan to help alleviate the loss brought on by the drought. CWS’s work includes a project targeting women that provides them with chickens and trains them in poultry farming techniques. During this training, women learn about feeding and sanitation control of the chicken coop. We hope that the agricultural assistance programs contribute to improved income for the displaced, which would then lead to better overall livelihood for the people.

Speaking to Students about Assistance for Afghanistan in an International Understanding Class at Japan Women’s University Junior High School

18th February 2020 11:00

  • アフガニスタン人道危機対応支援

On 15th February, JPF staff had the pleasure of visiting the international understanding class at Japan Women’s University Junior High School to speak about our assistance program in Afghanistan. The students had sent us their papers on Afghanistan beforehand, all of which impressed as they were thoroughly and clearly written. We posed the question, “How can you contribute to peace in Afghanistan?” and we saw so many great ideas including collecting donations, donating school supplies, knowing more about Afghanistan, telling people about the country, and learning their languages.

In class, JPF staff spoke to the students about JPF’s assistance program in Afghanistan, and also talked about his own experiences as staff. He touched on the cases of Afghan people during the 2015 European refugee crisis where they travelled across the Mediterranean by boat to head for Germany and other European nations.

While we are not sure if we delivered exactly what the students were expecting, we are still hopeful that this international understanding class served as an opportunity for the students to feel even closer to Afghanistan and their people, as well as others around the world, who are in need of assistance.

Attending SVA’s Reporting Session

17th February 2020 13:07

  • アフガニスタン人道危機対応支援

On 12th February, JPF staff attended the reporting session on Afghanistan hosted by our member NGO Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA). SVA’s local staff who works in Afghanistan had come to Japan and spoke at the session about the conditions in the country while providing updates. This was an invaluable experience to get first-person accounts of how life is like for the people in Afghanistan. For example, it was convincing to hear how girls’ low participation rate in schooling is not necessarily due to the teachings of Islam but largely due to their parents’ concerns about the school environment in Afghanistan today.

After the session, we had an opportunity to speak with SVA’s Afghan staff who had also come to Japan, and he had left a message for junior high school students with whom we will have an international understanding class about Afghanistan on 15th February. It is our hope that the staff working in Afghanistan will continue to engage in their projects safely.

Visit SVA’s website here: https://sva.or.jp/

JPF Member NGO SVA Hosting an Event on Afghanistan’s Conditions and Education

25th January 2020 11:00

JPF member NGO Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA) has been implementing protection, education, and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) programs to support internally displaced persons (IDPs) and repatriated refugees in Nangarhar and Kunar Provinces in Afghanistan. They are hosting an event in Tokyo to coincide with the visit of their Afghanistan office staff to Japan. Please see the event details below.

Afghanistan Office Staff Japan Visit Event: “We Want to Protect Books and Education from Conflict”
- Date & Time: Wednesday 12th February 2020, 19:00-20:30 (Registration beginning at 18:30)
- Venue: READYFOR Inc. (Address: Sumitomo Real Estate Fukuoka Hanzomon Building 2nd Floor, 1-12-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo)

On the Passing of Dr. Tetsu Nakamura

4th December 2019 23:25

We were greatly saddened to hear of the untimely death of Dr. Tetsu Nakamura, a physician and the field representative of Peshawar-kai. Dr. Nakamura has devoted his efforts in Afghanistan and Pakistan for many years, working on medical aid and rural reconstruction projects there. We would like to express our sincere condolences to his family, the families of others who have lost their lives with him, the local staff of his organization, and others who knew and worked with them.

Dr. Nakamura considered it of utmost importance that he respects the local people and builds a trusting relationship with them. We hope to follow in his footsteps as we continue our own work in Afghanistan with our member NGOs. Once again, we would like to express our deepest sympathies.

Mainichi Shimbun newspaper has posted a video on its YouTube channel today entitled, “Trust is Most Important - Words Left by Dr. Tetsu Nakamura”:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4_L-MIx0Lg

SVA Training Local Teachers

19th November 2019 11:27

  • Providing training for primary school teachers ©SVAProviding training for primary school teachers ©SVA

In Afghanistan, Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA), a JPF member NGO, is supporting refugee and migrant children in their education. SVA is offering trainings for schoolteachers as part of educational assistance for this population. Teachers play a vital role in the education of children, especially in following the curricula set by the Afghan Ministry of Education. Through this program, SVA is also promoting women to flourish in Afghan society while respecting the culture of the land where gender roles are clearly demarcated. We hope that the program leads to creating an environment where female teachers can be actively involved and successful in their careers.

You can read SVA's activity report here: https://sva.or.jp/wp/?p=35998

Creating a Safe Space for Children to Study: Shanti Volunteer Association

29th October 2019 23:00

  • Creating an enrollment list for the children ©SVACreating an enrollment list for the children ©SVA

As a JPF grant project, JPF member NGO Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA) has been implementing protection, WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene), and education programs to support internally displaced persons (IDPs) and repatriated residents in Nangarhar and Kunar Provinces in Afghanistan. As part of their educational program, SVA is planning on hosting classes for children (in primary educational grades 1 through 6) who are living under the influence of conflict and disaster. It is our hope that SVA’s program helps establish an environment where the children’s desire to learn is valued and cultivated.

Please find SVA’s activity report here: https://sva.or.jp/wp/?p=35615

Emergency Response to Humanitarian Crisis in Afghanistan: Contributing to Improving Livelihood through Agricultural Assistance

10th September 2019 19:30

  • Agricultural assistance program ©CWSAgricultural assistance program ©CWS

JPF member NGO CWS Japan, in coordination with their local partner CWSA, has been providing agricultural assistance in Bamiyan to help alleviate the loss brought on by the drought. As CWS supports the local community in the development of irrigation facilities and poultry farming, there is hope for improvement in the livelihood for the farmers who are beneficiaries of this program.

Please find CWS’s activity report here: https://bit.ly/2kreEEZ


Emergency Response to Humanitarian Crisis in Afghanistan: Gaining access to water needed for survival

20th August 2019 19:30

  • First spray of water comes out of the well built together with residents ©SVAFirst spray of water comes out of the well built together with residents ©SVA
  • Residents learn about how to maintain and manage the well ©SVAResidents learn about how to maintain and manage the well ©SVA

Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA), a JPF member NGO, is building wells to secure access to clean water and providing education on water, sanitation and hygiene, in the eastern region of Afghanistan as one of the aid programs targeting repatriated refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs).
The region where SVA is delivering aid had a large inflow of IDPs fleeing from neighboring regions that had deteriorated in safety. This had led to existing wells being overused. Due to these circumstances, the new and much-needed well was finally completed and a ceremony was held to hand it over to the residents.
With the completion of the new well, locals can now procure the water they need from within their own community. A committee that manages the well was formed among residents and they received training to learn about how to maintain and manage the well.
▼See here for SVA’s activity report
https://sva.or.jp/wp/?p=34894

Emergency Response to Humanitarian Crisis in Afghanistan: Improving the lives of repatriated refugees and IDPs

24th July 2019 22:0

  • Explaining the program to the local community ©SVAExplaining the program to the local community ©SVA

Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA), a JPF member NGO, is launching three programs in Nangarhar Province in Afghanistan and other locations for the rapidly increasing number of repatriated refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs), focusing on the empowerment of women, educational support through community-based classrooms, construction of wells for securing water supply and educating people on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH).
To empower women, SVA has created a place where women can gather, with the aim that these women will acquire basic knowledge about gender, sanitation and hygiene, and the protection of children. As for providing educational support through community-based classrooms, SVA is providing a place where children out of school can receive educational opportunities. Lastly, in terms of construction of wells for securing water supply and educating people on WASH, they are working to resolve the lack of water in communities where many IDPs and repatriated refugees live and improve their sanitation and hygiene conditions.
▼See here for SVA’s activity report
https://sva.or.jp/wp/?p=34515

Emergency Response to Humanitarian Crisis in Afghanistan: Changes in the community after raising awareness for water, sanitation and hygiene

12th July 2019 22:00

  • Raising awareness for water, sanitation and hygiene ©SVARaising awareness for water, sanitation and hygiene ©SVA
  • At a community cleanup ©SVAAt a community cleanup ©SVA

Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA), a JPF member NGO, is running a JPF-funded program to raise awareness for water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) among internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the eastern region of Afghanistan.
SVA is teaching them how to prevent and treat waterborne diseases. One participant of a WASH session said, “I learned a lot about waste treatment and waterborne diseases. I would like to put what I learned into practice in my everyday life, and try to stay healthy and avoid getting sick.”
▼See here for SVA’s activity report
https://sva.or.jp/wp/?p=34251

Humanitarian Response to Afghanistan: Distributing Water Hygiene Kits to Children

21st June 2019 19:30

  • Children receiving hygiene kits ©SVAChildren receiving hygiene kits ©SVA

As a JPF grant project, JPF member NGO Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA) is implementing water and hygiene awareness-raising activities in eastern Afghanistan for internally displaced persons (IDPs) and repatriated refugees from Pakistan.

In 2018, SVA provided water hygiene training for over 100 schoolteachers, and the teachers, in turn, are educating the children about proper handwashing based on SVA’s advice. So far, hygiene kits have been distributed to over 5,000 primary school students. The kit includes soap, toilet paper, a toothbrush, and a towel, and the children can practice at home what they learned in water hygiene education at school, which enables them to protect their families’ and their own health.

Article about this project by the SVA can be read here: https://sva.or.jp/wp/?p=33782

Humanitarian Response to Afghanistan: People Caught in the Conflict - Landmines Take the Lives of 7 Children

17th May 2019 19:30

On 11th May, Jiji.com news (Jiji Press Ltd.) reported that 7 children were killed and two were injured in the landmine explosion in Ghazni Province in eastern Afghanistan.

Due to the long civil conflict in Afghanistan, there are landmines as well as unexploded, rocket, or homemade bombs left in various places throughout the country, and many civilians continue to be victimized by them. Just last month, it was reported that seven were killed and ten injured in the eastern province of Laghman when children were playing with unexploded bombs.

Humanitarian Response to Afghanistan: JPF Member NGO CWS Continuing Assistance for People Affected by the Drought

20th March 2019 19:00

As a JPF grant project, JPF member NGO CWS Japan (CWS) is continuing the support for the people in Bamyan, Afghanistan, who are affected by the drought. The drought has resulted in difficulties securing income and food for the long-term. For these residents, the project supports the rebuilding of their livelihood as they secure food and income so that their lives become more independent and that they can maintain their health.

Humanitarian Response to Afghanistan: JPF Member NGO Peace Winds Japan Continuing Assistance for People Affected by the Drought

25th January 2019 23:00

As a JPF grant project, JPF member NGO Peace Winds Japan (PWJ) is continuing the support for the people in Afghanistan who are affected by the serious drought that occurs every year. Their relief activities are implemented in partnership with a local NGO.

PWJ distributes daily essential items to households, digs wells, and repairs underground water channels that are locally referred to as ”kariz” (or “qanat” in other parts of the world) to help bring safe water to the people affected by the severe drought in the local communities.

Since July 2016, there has been a rapid increase of Afghans returning from Pakistan, with a total of around 620,000 people having made the return to Afghanistan. During 2017, an additional one million refugees are expected to return, potentially making this the largest repatriation of Afghan refugees in history. Many of the 620,000 returnees remain in the northeastern part of the country, with a concentration in two areas: around 278,000 in Nangarhar Province and around 111,000 in Kabul Province. As many returned in haste, they have not secured places to stay, nor enough essential items or food. It is estimated that 540,000 persons are in need of food, 162,000 persons are in need of essential goods, and 47,000 persons are in need of WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) assistance.
Being cramped into small spaces, often with not enough mats for the number of people lying down, their living conditions cannot be considered sufficient from a humanitarian standpoint.

In response to reports from JPF member NGOs and a UN appeal for assistance, JPF launched the Emergency Response to Afghan Repatriated Refugees 2017 program on February 16, 2017.

On February 20, 2017, AAR Japan (Association for Aid and Relief, Japan) began its initial assessment on the ground. Having conducted surveys with over 2,000 households, they are trying to gain a thorough understanding of the status quo and the needs on the ground. Five other JPF member NGOs will also launch their assistance shortly.

*The figures above are based on OCHA's "Afghanistan: Returnee Crisis Situation Report" No.6 (as of 29 January 2017).

"Afghanistan Humanitarian Assistance 2016" can be found here

Program Overview

Response Period 12 months
Budget 156 million yen (private and government funding)
Location Afghanistan (Nangarhar Province, Laghman Province)

NGO's Project : CWS Japan

Providing essential supplies and cash assistance to those who continue to live in displacement even after returning to their home country

Every week, about one thousand Afghans who had been living in refuge in Pakistan, are crossing the border with little more than the clothes on their backs, as their lives in Pakistan have become insecure. However, even when they succeed in returning to their home country, they are in need of essential supplies to rebuild their lives after repatriation. CWS Japan has been delivering assistance to improve the safety and enrollment rates in girls' schools in the Nangarhar Province in eastern Afghanistan, and it has an office and track record on the ground. From March 2017, it has been providing sleeping kits to returnees in this area, as well as cash assistance so that they can purchase food, medicine, and heating and cooking appliances.

Voice from the Field

Family suffering from poverty and insecurity, sustaining a minimal level of living through humanitarian assistance

Voice from the FieldI was five when I arrived at the refugee camp in Pakistan. What awaited me was poor living conditions and early marriage due to economic reasons. After I became married, we--not just myself but also my children--began working at a brick kiln to pay for my husband's medical bills and to cover the costs of living. My heart broke when I saw my own children working under such poor working conditions. Six months ago, we sold off all of our belongings at a cheap price, and I returned to Afghanistan with my husband and seven children. However, we have suffered from poverty due to joblessness and heightening insecurity. During this time, we have somehow been able to sustain a minimum level of living through humanitarian assistance.